Broken Bootstraps: building empathy with video games

Broken Bootstraps: building empathy with video games

According to a Boston Magazine article from February 2016, Boston’s cost of living is 39.7 percent above the U.S. average, with groceries and health care running 26 percent above average, while the median household income in the city remains on par with the rest of the country. Only nine percent of today’s rental housing listings are within reach of households with $50,000 annual incomes, while a tiny one percent of listings are affordable to households with $25,000 annual incomes. 

Where do you fit in? 

Click here to play Broken Bootstraps

Today was Northeastern University’s School of Journalism hackathon Urban Tensions, run by professors Matt Carroll (of Spotlight fame), John Wihbey, Dietmar Offenhuber and Aleszu Bajak. The program itself was split into two halves: three 5-minute “lightning” talks followed by about 4 hours of actual creation. The idea was to build visualizations based on data available in Boston specifically.

We had three guest speakers, and I’m going to focus solely on Christine Dixon’s talk as it was what sparked my idea. (If you want to know more about the hackathon itself, Rowan Walrath posted a Storify from the event. Check that out here.  Continue reading “Broken Bootstraps: building empathy with video games”

Advertisements

Racial Diversity and Data Visualization

We’ve been working on data visualization in class with Northeastern’s John Wihbey, and after doing a brief exercise involving the gender breakdown of Silicon Valley, I decided to look into the breakdown from a racial perspective (this is a blog on race after all). Pulling data from Facebook, Google, and Apple’s 2014 Equal Employment Opportunity reports, I made up this quick graphic to display the racial diversity (or lack thereof) in three of the biggest tech companies in the game. While Facebook, Google, and Apple may be getting more diverse in their hiring of women (it’s still not great, but it is getting better—see the last year column in the individual reports), Silicon Valley has a long way to go to level the playing field for racial diversity.