Undocumented immigrants do not make United States less safe

Reposting from Ruggles Media, with a big thanks to Paxtyn for all the heavy lifting in the coding this piece!

Source: Undocumented immigrants do not make United States less safe

“When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. They’re not sending you. They’re not sending you. They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.” – Donald Trump, June 2015

Despite President Trump’s xenophobic speeches, the United States is actually getting safer. Since 1990, property crime and violent crime have decreased, while more unauthorized immigrants have entered the country. Although correlation doesn’t imply causation, the American Immigration Councilanalyzed U.S. Census data and concluded that foreign-born individuals are less likely to engage in criminal activity than American-born individuals.

Read the rest at Ruggles Media!

 

Voter Intimidation is Illegal, Yet Trump Still Calls for it

Let’s play a game! If you can successfully answer the following direction, you get to vote in this upcoming presidential election. If not, too bad.

Draw five circles that one common inter-locking part.

Confused by the usage of “that” instead of “with”? Confused about how to draw five circles that only overlap in one place? Confused as to what this has to do with your voting rights? This question was on a Louisiana Literacy test (from 1964) considered to be impossible–and to be taken in 10 minutes. You can take it at Slate or take a slightly less frustrating version at the Civil Rights Movement Veteran’s Website.

Thankfully, voter literacy exams aren’t used any more to disenfranchise Black voters but worry not! There are still ways to suppress voters. For example, by harassing minority voters at the polls, demanding to see proper identification from minority voters, or threatening violence on minority voters.

Continue reading “Voter Intimidation is Illegal, Yet Trump Still Calls for it”

Trump’s Problem With (White) Women

The past week has been rough for the Trump camp. A leaked tape from 2005 let voters hear Trump and Billy Bush, the host of Access Hollywood, talking trash about women. Including a choice quote of Trump saying that, “And when you’re a star they let you do it…You can do anything … Grab them by the pussy. You can do anything.”

Beyond Trump repeating himself all the time (does no one remember Trump making fun of Rubio for repeating himself??) we have the crux of issue: Trump says he assaulted women. Then he backtracks, saying it was just “locker room talk” and that he has never done these things. In and of itself, it’s shady, but people brag when they think they’re doing something great, right?

Continue reading “Trump’s Problem With (White) Women”

Hilarious Racism is, in Fact, Not Hilarious

In other news, water is wet.

On Monday, The O’Reilly Factor ran a “satirical” segment known as Watters’ World, in which Jesse Watters conducts Man on the Street interviews in New York’s Chinatown to ask residents what they think of Donald Trump. Fox Nation, the opinion branch of Fox News called the segment “hilarious”, hilarious because Asians can’t speak Engrish good.

Continue reading “Hilarious Racism is, in Fact, Not Hilarious”

Building the Beat: 10 Folks to Follow on Twitter

Walk into any intro journalism class anywhere in the country and one of the first questions posed is, “Where do you get your news?” The reality is that today, while most folks still get their news from television sources, a great deal of it (especially in that coveted 18-24 bracket) is digital, and more specifically, mobile. With that in mind, here’s a quick list of Twitter accounts I follow that help to shape my beat of Media and Race in America.

  1. Charles Blow, New York Times columnist and author of the (haunting and powerful) memoir Fire Shut Up In My Bones. Lately, Blow has been focusing a lot on politics, and has been writing some great pieces on Trump’s relationship with Black America.
  2. Yamiche Alcindor, another New York Times writer who covers national politics and social justice issues. I met her during my time at MSNBC, but she garnered a bit of attention when asking Senator Bernie Sanders a question.
  3. Jose-Antonio Vargas is an undocumented, gay, Filipino activist who tweets a great deal about immigration and intersectional identities. He’s also the director and producer of two films: MTV’s White People and Documented.
  4. Arthur Chu, who many know as the Asian Guy on Jeopardy, has since used his fame to address issues of sexism, racism and homophobia, particularly in nerd culture.
  5. Ta-Nehisi Coates is one of The Atlantic’s national correspondent and the author of Between the World and Me and more recently the Marvel Comic series Black Panther. Between the World and Me was written to be an updated version of James Baldwin’s “The Fire Next Time,” a response to today’s racial unrest, and practically all of Coates work reflects his reality as a Black man in America.
  6. Liz Plank, of Vox, was named on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 in 2015. She used to be with Mic and formerly was a correspondent on MSNBC’s Krystal Clear, and while she mainly covers the 2016 election for Vox, her twitter account is a great source of commentary on all things race, feminism, and fact checking.
  7. Rabia Chaudry, a lawyer and the author of Adnan’s Story, the New York Times’ best-seller that follows up on the case of Adnan Syed. (If the name doesn’t ring a bell, go binge the first season of Serial–this case is one of the most important ones of 2014.) Chaudry uses her twitter account to talk about the rampant Islamophobia in our country.
  8. Ijeoma Oluo is an editor at the online weekly The Establishment. As with many folks in the journalism industry, Oluo’s feed is a mix of professional and personal, and she unapologetically tweets on police brutality and anti-Black racism on a daily basis.
  9. Jeff Yang, formerly of the Wall Street Journal, is now with CNN, but his real strength are his twitter rants, especially those directed at celebrities.
  10. Trymaine Lee is a national reporter for NBC and MSNBC, and as of right now, he’s covering the Charlotte Riots. If you want live updates right now, go to his page. He recently wrote a powerful feature on the Dakota Access Pipeline–a timely reminder that race issues in America are broader than just Black and White.

Keep in mind, I’m currently following close to a thousand accounts on Twitter, but these 10 are first and foremost the ones I recommend when it comes to covering race on our favorite 140-character platform. Is there anyone I missed? Who do you follow?

Democrats and Mental Health

Democrats and Mental Health

I didn’t mean to kill myself. Or maybe I did. But it has to count for something that I walked myself down to the local hospital just before 5 a.m. and asked to voluntarily commit myself.

I was lucky. Despite vomiting blood, I had no major internal organ damage and I failed to cut deeply in my attempts to slit my wrists or my throat. They even managed to find me a bed in the psych ward after only 18 hours in the ER. That’s unusual—often times people stay in emergency departments for days before a bed opens up. Or they get shuffled around to different psychiatric units, sometimes out of state.

It was past midnight by the time I finally was cleared by the night-shift psychiatrist and given a bed. The first person to talk to me was a boy who helped me get acclimated to the ward. He told me a bit about himself, how he dropped out of high school and couldn’t keep a job due to his illness. On his 21st birthday, which was my second day in the ward, I asked him what he wanted for his birthday. He said that all he wanted was to go out to dinner with his mom and four brothers. Later in the week, I learned he was committed for attempting to murder his entire family.

Continue reading “Democrats and Mental Health”