Broken Bootstraps: building empathy with video games

Broken Bootstraps: building empathy with video games

According to a Boston Magazine article from February 2016, Boston’s cost of living is 39.7 percent above the U.S. average, with groceries and health care running 26 percent above average, while the median household income in the city remains on par with the rest of the country. Only nine percent of today’s rental housing listings are within reach of households with $50,000 annual incomes, while a tiny one percent of listings are affordable to households with $25,000 annual incomes. 

Where do you fit in? 

Click here to play Broken Bootstraps

Today was Northeastern University’s School of Journalism hackathon Urban Tensions, run by professors Matt Carroll (of Spotlight fame), John Wihbey, Dietmar Offenhuber and Aleszu Bajak. The program itself was split into two halves: three 5-minute “lightning” talks followed by about 4 hours of actual creation. The idea was to build visualizations based on data available in Boston specifically.

We had three guest speakers, and I’m going to focus solely on Christine Dixon’s talk as it was what sparked my idea. (If you want to know more about the hackathon itself, Rowan Walrath posted a Storify from the event. Check that out here.  Continue reading “Broken Bootstraps: building empathy with video games”

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2014: Northeastern Rally Pushes for Institutional Reform

In light of Sexual Assault Awareness Month (aka April) being just around the corner, I’m very belatedly publishing a piece I wrote a few years ago about the manner in which Northeastern University handles sexual assault cases. It’s been over 2 years; what has changed since then? More cases, and not much reform from an institutional perspective. As always, many thanks to everyone involved in this piece, named and unnamed. Your voices are critical.

December 8, 2014

MEGAPHONE IN HAND, HELEN IS LOUD.

Her voice is cracking as she leads a chant at a rally against sexual assault in Centennial Commons at Northeastern University. Later, sitting in a study room in Northeastern’s library, her demeanor shifts. Gone is the chant-leader bounding around, calling energetically for the end of the patriarchy. Now, her speech is slow, her words specific.

It has been two years and two months since Helen—a third-year international relations and anthropology major—was raped. Standing before a crowd on an unseasonably warm November day, she bravely said, “I’ve been silent for too long.” But in the private setting of the study room, she is fidgety, picking at her cuticles and playing with her rings.  Continue reading “2014: Northeastern Rally Pushes for Institutional Reform”

Undocumented immigrants do not make United States less safe

Reposting from Ruggles Media, with a big thanks to Paxtyn for all the heavy lifting in the coding this piece!

Source: Undocumented immigrants do not make United States less safe

“When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. They’re not sending you. They’re not sending you. They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.” – Donald Trump, June 2015

Despite President Trump’s xenophobic speeches, the United States is actually getting safer. Since 1990, property crime and violent crime have decreased, while more unauthorized immigrants have entered the country. Although correlation doesn’t imply causation, the American Immigration Councilanalyzed U.S. Census data and concluded that foreign-born individuals are less likely to engage in criminal activity than American-born individuals.

Read the rest at Ruggles Media!

 

No, #OscarsSoWhite Isn’t Over

Rowena Lindsay and I wrote this piece up for Ruggles Media, Northeastern University’s School of Journalism’s storytelling site. Check out the page, and enjoy our piece on this year’s Oscar nominations!

It’s awards season in America and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has produced its least-White list of nominations. Taking a step away from the #OscarsSoWhite controversy of 2…

Source: No, #OscarsSoWhite Isn’t Over

Standing Up For Black Lives: How Asian Americans Are Showing Their Solidarity

Standing Up For Black Lives: How Asian Americans Are Showing Their Solidarity

As my final for Dan Kennedy’s Digital Storytelling and Social Media, I chose to focus on the work being done by the Asian American community in Boston to support Black folks. There’s more work to be done than simply covering the work others do, but for now, we still need to give voice to marginalized communities, especially when they are doing cross-community work the way the Sticky Rice Project and Asian Pacific Islanders for Black Lives do. While these pieces are by no means exhaustive, please enjoy my video below, and check out the accompanying article and slideshow!

Continue reading “Standing Up For Black Lives: How Asian Americans Are Showing Their Solidarity”

Angry Asian Nation

“A daily must-read for the media-savvy, socially conscious, pop-cultured Asian American.” -The Washington Post

Phil Yu’s blog Angry Asian Man has been around since 2001, meaning most of my life, and growing up, it was something I was introduced to by my mom to become more culturally aware of my own background. Yu isn’t as angry as he purports to be, and much of the blog is pop culture things, features on Asian Americans, articles on Asian American history, and some news on anti-Asian racism. While the site itself is clearly a blog, it also looks very much like it hasn’t been changed since 2001, and maybe that’s what I love about it.

Continue reading “Angry Asian Nation”

What is Whiteness?

I’ve been thinking about this question a lot. As some may know, I run a blog on mixed race identity called I Am Hapa (“hapa” being the Hawaiian word for half) and while I haven’t been posting on it much, my friend Grace recently wrote a guest post for it. In fact, her post and my other friend Kiyomi’s post have two key pieces I want to focus on today. Grace talks about passing—in her case, being half-Black and passing for White—and in Kiyomi’s, the enduring shame that is intrinsic to being mixed.

Both posts mention our hometown, a strange bubble of New Jersey that is pretty much half-Black and half-White as Grace notes. It was less unusual to be mixed race growing up there, but for sure, people would see me with my White father and ask where I was adopted from. As an adult, I still get the question, but worded differently: where are you from? Jersey. No, where are you really from?

Continue reading “What is Whiteness?”